Tag Archives: resumes/cover letters/jobs/careers/interviews

  • Should Resume Advice Come from Graphic Designers?

    By Michelle Hutchinson A provocative article, The Best and Worst Fonts to Use on Your Resume, has been making the rounds this week. Published on the Bloomberg Business website, the post contains input from three typographers on the type style to use on your…you guessed it: resume. Four people have asked me for my feedback […]

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  • What Do Employees Really Want? Why Do They Thrive or Leave?

    By Michelle Hutchinson My last three blog posts have focused on steps job seekers can take to find their next position. But what about employers? What can they do keep employees and minimize turnover? After all, if you’re a business owner or are in a supervisory position, you don’t want to lose good employees, especially […]

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  • How to Use Facebook in Your Job Search

    By Michelle Hutchinson This is part III in a three-part series on how to use social media in your job search. In parts I and II of this series, you discovered the ways in which using LinkedIn and Twitter can lead to success as you look for your next (or first) job. Many of the […]

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  • How to Use Twitter in Your Job Search

    By Michelle Hutchinson Last month I shared Transition Sherpa’s tips on using LinkedIn to find your next job. But according to Jeff Sheehan, one of Transition Sherpa’s co-founders, Twitter is another online platform that should be part of your job-search strategy. Here’s how he recommends using this tool. Using Twitter to Forge Relationships Part of […]

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  • How to Use LinkedIn to Find Your Next Job

    By Michelle Hutchinson With a 2014 Jobvite survey reporting that 94% of recruiters use LinkedIn to find potential job candidates, you can’t afford NOT to be using LinkedIn in your job search. And with all the new features LinkedIn has added, this professional networking site now gives you the opportunity to showcase more than what […]

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  • Why Targeted Resumes Are the Only Ones That Work

    By Michelle Hutchinson In my last post, I talked about the importance of knowing who your target audience is when marketing your book. Targeting is just as important when using a resume to market yourself for a job. Your resume must be targeted to a specific type of job or related jobs (e.g., mortgage banker […]

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  • What’s the Difference Between a Resume and a Bio?

    by Michelle Hutchinson Periodically, I get approached by business owners who tell me they need a resume, but after listening for a while, I discover that what they really want is a bio. What’s the difference between a resume and a bio? Use a resume if you’re looking for a job. It’s the document (electronic […]

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  • Students, New Graduates Should Highlight Extracurriculars on Resumes

    by Michelle Hutchinson Every day, a new article seems to appear describing how much more money college graduates will earn if they major in technical fields as opposed to the liberal arts.* While no one can deny that technical jobs are harder to fill, students who majored in the humanities and social sciences shouldn’t believe […]

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  • A Writing Lesson from Health Literacy Month

    by Michelle Hutchinson Image source: http://mrg.bz/7IcjTf Halloween might be October’s most well-known observance, but all of October is Health Literacy Month. What the heck is health literacy, you ask, and what does it have to do with writing? Just as literacy reflects your ability to not only read, but understand what you read, health literacy […]

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  • How Often Should You Update Your Resume?

    by Michelle Hutchinson It’s Friday morning and your boss tells you she needs your resume by Monday; she wants to put you in the running for a promotion. Can you meet that deadline? You can if you’ve been regularly updating your resume or, at the very least, been keeping your own file of all your […]

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Michelle Hutchinson, Wordhelper

Michelle Hutchinson, Wordhelper

I've never been one to follow conventional wisdom—at least when it doesn't make sense to me—and I'm not about to start now. Conventional wisdom says to limit your blog to one topic (e.g., writing) or to related topics (e.g., writing, reading, publishing), but my interests are too diverse.

While a good deal of this blog will be devoted to writing, editing, and resumes, I'll also explore topics in health, science, education, and a smattering of other areas. After all, I'm not only an editor and writer, but I am or have been a dentist, teacher, naval officer, environmental researcher, wife, parent, and pet owner.

I hope you'll take some time to provide comments on the posts.

The medical and health content on this blog is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice.

See additional information.

The medical and health content on this blog, such as text, graphics, images, and other material are for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this blog. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Wordhelper does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on this blog. Reliance on any medical or health information provided by Wordhelper, Wordhelper employees, or others appearing on this blog at the invitation of Wordhelper, or other visitors or commentators to the blog is solely at your own risk.